Contacts!

I’m very proud to present the first release of Contacts – An evolution-data-server using address book, designed for use on hand-held devices (like the Nokia 770), but also quite useful on the desktop. Although it uses evolution-data-server, there are some incompatabilities with addresses in Evolution (as I try to conform to vCard specification and Evolution handles addresses very oddly). Hopefully you’ll enjoy the superior type and category handling though 🙂 Some screens:
Contacts main screen Contacts editing screen Contacts 'add field' dialogue If you want to check it out from subversion, you can do so with the following line:
svn co http://svn.o-hand.com/repos/contacts/trunk contacts Or you can grab the release tarball.

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Web progress

Web is making some pretty quick progress, I plan on making the first release next weekend. New features since last update: Tabbed browsing, simpler toolbar, history, error pages, less bugs. After it becomes usable (i.e. after I finish with bookmarks and the menus), I’ll start working on abstracting the backend and providing a gtk-webcore plugin. A gtkmozembed plugin would also be very easy to write, however, I think I may not out of principal (gecko isn’t the be-all and end-all of html rendering libraries people!) Hopefully this browser will spark some interest in gtkhtml2 – I hope to do some work on it myself, it seems like it could do with a new maintainer (bugs with attached patches that haven’t been resolved in bugzilla, etc.)… Will see – Anyway, Screenshot

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OpenedHand, web, uni

The holiday period has come to and end, as has my contract with OpenedHand unfortunately. I’ve definitely had a lot of fun working with the guys there and hope to be able to carry on part-time; there’s certainly a lot more I want to do. During this short break, I’ve been working on my web browser. It no longer uses synchronous wget instances to fetch, but asynchronous gnome-vfs calls – I’ve made a few other improvements too and it’s actually starting to become a functional browser (it’s good enough to search on google :)). GtkHtml2 has a lot of oddities that I’d like to fix once this browser reaches a state of stability – the biggest being how it changes the top-level window menubar background colour to white… That’s a very weird bug. Although the likelihood of it ever happening is just about zero, it would be nice to see GtkHtml2 become a viable alternative to gecko, at least for memory-limited systems (gtkhtml + deps make minimo look monolithic). A couple of screens: Screen 1, Screen 2.

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LinuxWorld

LinuxWorld tomorrow, and I’ll be there with the rest of the OpenedHand guys – Should be exciting, if I’m awake enough after stupidly staying up late and hacking on this – a web-browser that uses libgtkhtml2 to render and wget to download (yes, horrible, I know…) – libgtkhtml2 does a surprisingly good job of a lot of pages, I’d like to see it developed (the code reads nicely, is written in C and doesn’t depend on every library under the sun! huzzah!)

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Overlapping events in DatesView

This took a bit of thinking and I’ve done it in an incredibly inefficient way, but DatesView now supports displaying of overlapping events and distributes the space as efficiently as possible (I think) 🙂 Screen:
Screenshot of Dates displaying overlapping events Also got my new computer this week, I’ve been enjoying 64-bit Linux. Having no Flash support in the browser has been quite a blessing… No more crazy frog scaring the crap out of me when I’m browsing with my speakers on at night :p

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Events

DatesView now displays events 🙂 It’s very preliminary, but it’s there and I’ll be working on it – The display properly responds to changes in the calendar, so you can create and move events around in Evolution and watch them displayed and updated in Dates – Now to refine that and get onto editing 🙂 Obligatory screenshot:
Screenshot of Dates displaying events

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Dates committed!

First commit has been made for my calendar app, aptly named ‘Dates’. Available on the OH svn repo under ‘dates’ – Not sure what the address would be for that but no one reads my blog, so no one will be trying it for now anyway 🙂 A screenshot:
First shot of Dates The interface is pretty preliminary, I doubt that’s how it’ll look by the time it actually does anything (other than smoothly zoom in and out of the calendar).

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libecal documentation

I’ve started work designing a new calendar application using libecal. I’ve always wondered why more GNOME apps don’t use evolution-data-server/libebook/libecal. Given that it’s part of GNOME and PIM is quite an integral part of a desktop, you’d think that people would be jumping to use them, especially given the API is quite nice to use… Today I find out why: libecal has a serious lack of documentation :/ I don’t think I’d have the courage to do this if I hadn’t ported the calendar side of eds earlier this year. Working at OpenedHand has been great 🙂

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